Harvard’s Intellectual Property Expert Says ‘No One Knows How To Protect’ Source BBC News

The Harvard University intellectual property expert, Michael Luebke, said he is “very concerned” that “no one knows how to protect intellectual property” and that the “world will end” if there is not a “big bang of innovation”.

In a speech at the Brookings Institution, Luebcke made the comments in response to a question about whether it was possible to protect copyright on software, as Microsoft is currently pursuing.

Luebbke’s remarks follow those of the UK’s Chief Technology Officer Mark Thompson, who said in June that copyright on computer software “is a global problem”.

The UK government has pledged to publish a report in 2020 outlining how best to protect the copyright of software.

“If you’re a cop, you know that copyright is a global issue and that it needs to be managed by multiple governments, that you have to protect multiple countries, that we need to protect people across different geographical regions,” Lueebke told the Brookings.

It’s going to require a big bang of technological innovation that’s going a lot faster than we’ve been able to achieve over the last 20 years.” “

But it’s not going to be solved by a few laws that are written up in a few jurisdictions.

It’s going to require a big bang of technological innovation that’s going a lot faster than we’ve been able to achieve over the last 20 years.”

Luebfke has also written a number of reports and policy papers on intellectual property and the Internet.

He said the United States has one of the “greatest” intellectual property regimes in the developed world, but said the US has “no clear strategy for protecting IP” and has been “lagging far behind” Europe in “proactive IP protection”.

He added that the EU is doing an “overwhelming” job protecting IP, while the US should focus more on copyright.

“We have no clear strategy, we have no direction, we’re just moving ahead and doing what we can,” he said.

“And I think we’ve got to do more than just what we’re doing.

I think the world will end if we don’t.”

There’s no doubt about that. “

It’s going be a global mess.

He also said the “future of the internet is not in Europe” and said that “many of the countries that we are talking about in Europe are very much ahead of the curve”. “

I think the answer is we have to think big.”

He also said the “future of the internet is not in Europe” and said that “many of the countries that we are talking about in Europe are very much ahead of the curve”.

Luebske said that the US and Europe are “really far behind in IP protection” but that “we’re going to get to the right place very quickly”.

He also warned that a new wave of innovation is coming to the market and said it will lead to “much bigger problems”.

“In many ways, what’s happened in the past 20 years is that we’ve just gone through a lot, we’ve seen the internet go from a tiny startup to a billion dollar company, we saw the internet become a giant, we see people from the developing world and countries like China and India all working on the same thing, and it’s a really exciting time,” he added.

Luebeke also spoke out about the impact of new technology on jobs. “

What are the policies and the regulatory frameworks that we’re going see in the coming years that will help to prevent this kind of situation?”

Luebeke also spoke out about the impact of new technology on jobs.

“What’s happened over the past few years is, in a lot more places, you’re going from jobs that are mostly automated to jobs that rely on human input,” he told the audience.

“As a society, we are going to need to rethink how we are managing this and how we manage the next generation.” “

In his speech, Luesbke said he believes “the only thing that is truly safe is innovation, because if we can’t keep innovation going, we’ll have a really dangerous future.””

As a society, we are going to need to rethink how we are managing this and how we manage the next generation.”

In his speech, Luesbke said he believes “the only thing that is truly safe is innovation, because if we can’t keep innovation going, we’ll have a really dangerous future.”